#WeAreN - The Sign of Iraq Solidarity

For over half a year, we have all watched with horror, the unparalleled levels of ethnic cleansing, being forced upon Iraqi Christians by the Islamic State. 

It has almost been like a Biblical prophecy of suffering, with echoes of NAZI Germany, as native Iraqi Christians, after two thousand years, have been forcibly ejected from their homes, deprived of water and food, and told to convert to Islam or face death. 

Media outlets like Iraq Solidarity News (Al-Thawra) have also reported, how personal items were stolen from Iraqi Christians, when fleeing the ISIS/ISIL advance, and how Christian homes and ancestral land, were given out freely, to international Jihadists and their “brides”. 

The United Nations and other organisations, have also come out and condemned the destruction of Christian, Yazidi and Shiite holy sites in ISIS occupied area’s of Iraq, with other reports illustrating how Churches have been raised to the ground, or turned into warehouses for munitions storage. 

Reports have also spoken about the brutal conditions Iraqi Christians are being forced to live under, as displaced persons in refugee camps and how, with the assistance of international aid efforts, are now struggling to survive. 

The global Christian movements, have been so horrified that they have mobilised in their thousands against the actions of ISIS, with prominent figures such as the Bishop of Manchester, calling on the British Government to grant immediate asylum to those Iraqi Christians wanting to flee to Britain. 

Around the world, people of all religions have also adopted the slogan #WeAreN, in solidarity with those facing persecution and in opposition to the daubing of the Arabic letter “N” for Nazarene, onto the homes of Iraq’s Christian population. 

Within the United Kingdom, Aid for the Church in Need has recently opened its North West office in Lancaster, where covering Manchester, Liverpool and other area’s, is now undertaking the task of supporting Iraqi Christians, who are stranded in refugee camps, or have been fortunate enough to be relocated to Britain. 

There are a multiple of ways that people can get involved with Aid for the Church in Need, and show solidarity with both Iraq’s refugee’s and aid workers. Simple steps can include making a purchase of a WeAreN wristband for just £1.00, or a T-Shirt for under £10.00

Other approaches can include making a direct donation or by volunteering some time to help ACN at public events. Another could be fundraising at one of many North West based activities, like a Zip Wire Challenge, or by taking part in the famous 10K runs, which are held each year in both Liverpool and Manchester

Already, I’ve liked and followed their social networks, and have invited my friends to join me but I would also like to see more followers of @ACNUK_NW on Twitter and on the charities national Facebook page. I also hope that people will equally include them as a #FF and #CharityTuesday, along with sharing other bits of information and news, on ACN’s most excellent work.

Sir. Peter Fahy & Manchester’s Age of "Extreme"

What is more extreme, for a Chief Constable of a major city like Manchester, than knowing your citizens are leaving your country and flying half way around the world, to illegally enter a foreign country and then take up arms against a native people. 

What is more extreme, than knowing your citizens, are brutally displacing citizens of a foreign land, carrying out acts of murder, which have been described as “war crimes” by the international community and then glorifying genocide, by posting celebratory pictures of gruesome images, on-to a variety of social networks. 

These are the points which seemed to be missed, by Sir. Peter Fahy, the Chief Constable for Greater Manchester Police, in his comments to the Guardian; Chief constable warns against‘drift towards police state.Apparently, it’s no-longer the job of the police to define what counts as extremism and said the government, academics and civil society needed to decide, where the line fell between free speech and extremist ideology.